Posts Tagged ‘Country’

Moccasin BenderRandy Steele has spent time as part of the band Slim Pickens Bluegrass. But after a few years in that musical ensemble, he went out on his own while taking the style of music that the group had been known for with him. Now as a solo artist, Steele has begun making a name for himself taking that style of music and making it fit his own personality. That resulted in the 2017 album entitled Songs from the Suck, a title that had to do with the location where Steele was from, Suck Creek, Tennessee.

Having released one solo album and finding a fanbase that was positively receptive to his music, Randy Steele returns with a new EP of music. This release is entitled Moccasin Bender.  And just like his previous album, the title of this new collection of music comes with a reference to the area where Steele comes from. Moccasin Bend is both an archaeological site and national park located in Tennessee.

With a lot of Bluegrass/Country music being influenced by real life, it comes as no surprise that Randy Steele would create a song that came straight out of his life. The EP lead-off song “Mabbitt Springs” deals with Steele being thankful that his son beat cancer. For this track and its upbeat message, Steele creates a musical background that contains a completely full sound consisting of banjo, slide guitar, fiddle and drums. That full sound leads off the EP which switches to a much simpler feel on the very next track.

Moccasin Bender continues with the track “Adam and Rose”. The simple musical accompaniment of just the banjo creates a relatively simple Bluegrass track. Like the previous song, “Adam and Rose“ finds Randy Steele creating a track with a real-life feel to the lyrics of the song. “Adam and Rose” features lyrics about two young adults making their way in the world and coming upon life’s everyday difficulties. The music’s slow pace seems to be a perfect fit as the music acts like the perfect bed for the lyrics that spell out the story.

The new six-song EP from Randy Steele continues with the track “Big Talkin’ Woman”. With this track, Steele creates one of the most commercial moments on his release. The track features a full-bodied feel to the music including a slide-guitar solo in the body of the track. While the song easily has a throwback feel to the music, that retro feel would have fit in well with songs in the seventies/eighties. “Big Talkin’ Woman” from Randy Steele will give fans of Old-fashioned Country music something to truly enjoy.

With the next track, Randy Steele touches on a subject that is rather difficult: Drug Addiction. The track called “Age of Ben” features lyrics that act as a storyline as Steele tells the story of as boy who never really had a real chance at life. The main character in the song is born with a developmental problem that gets worse later in life. And having been given up for adoption, he never got to know his real mother. When all gets too difficult to deal with, “Ben” turns to opium which just makes things worse. Just like with the track “Adam and Rose” earlier in the release, “Age of Ben” comes complete with a rather simplistic feel to the music. But unlike the other track which featured the banjo, this track finds Steel creating the simple music of the track with the guitar. The guitar-only background to the track seems to add to the sadness contained within the lyrics.

While several of the tracks on this release find Randy Steele exploring his storytelling side, the track “Rummies” finds him creating a track that has a rather familiar feel to those who know artists such as Gordon Lightfoot. In fact, if it wasn’t for the fact that this song was written around To Have and Have Not, a novel written by Ernest Hemmingway, it would have been a good guess that Steele had used Lightfoot as an influence for the track; which he may have as far as the music of the song is concerned. “Rummies” shows off Steele’s ability to take a storyline and set it to music.

Randy Steele’s new six-song EP comes to a close with the track “Pretty Little Girl with a Blue Dress On”. The track closes the EP out with one of the simplest musical approaches. The lone banjo and Randy Steele’s vocals on the short track bring to mind something that could have come from someone like The Stanley Brothers or someone else that are easily just as well-known from the Bluegrass genre.

Randy Steele stepped out on his own with his first release entitled Songs from the Suck. Taking the next step with his second release, Steele proves that his songwriting skills are still just as sharp. With the track “Adam and Rose” which features a rather simple musical back ground, or “Rummies” that shows off his ability to take an idea and make it his own, the Moccasin Bender release proves to be a well-made second release from the Tennessee-based Randy Steele.

For more information, check out his PR firm, Whiplash PR

Moccasin Bender from Randy Steele is due to be released in the near future. Until then, check out Randy Steele’s live version of “Adam and Rose,” a track that will be on the Moccasin Bender release. 

 

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CK and the TideNew York State-based singer-songwriter C.K. Flach continues to make a lot of noise, whether it’s playing drums for other people or it’s creating his own music. After releasing a solo album called Empty Mansions back about one year ago in 2017, the artist makes a return but this time, he brings along a few friends to help create the music. This time, Flach is joined by bassist Chris Brant, Danny Boudreau on violin and keys and his brother Wayne Flach on guitars. Together, the band known as C.K. and the Rising Tide are currently in the middle of creating their first album. However, the ensemble has released their first single off of the upcoming album as a way of promoting the release. The track is called “Friends”. Like the music that made up Flach’s 2017 album of Empty Mansions, “Friends” finds C.K. and the Rising Tide creating a track that falls into the Americana music genre. The track features a rather strong Country vibe to the music but also contains a strong Rock and Roll feel to go along with that Country approach. The Alt-Country feel of the track is matched up with a lyrical content with a rather strong political lean to it. The track’s lyrics deal with the fact that we humans, as a whole species, have different ways of looking at things. And while we may not agree with everything that everyone else has to say, we can, and should, find ways to survive with each other as we look for ways to live side-by-side instead of causing wars. With the current political climate of the nation being what it is, and with recent events in the country being cause for concern, the track’s message of unity through friendship is one we should all get behind. While the song “Friends” is only one track from C.K. and the Rising Tide, Flach’s 2017 solo release of Empty Mansions may be a good indicator of what is to come in the near future from the band.

To experience just a little of the new music from C.K. and the Rising Tide, check out the early release of the band’s song “Friends” by clicking on the link.   

For more information, check out the PR firm for C.K. and the Rising Tide, check out Whiplash PR

 

 

thegoodmorningnagsSix-piece NYC based ensemble The Good Morning Nags is currently in the middle of making a name for themselves. The band consists of founding members Tim Hassler (fiddle, vocals), Ben Quinn (mandolin, guitar, harmonium, vocals), Titus Tompkins (percussion, mandolin, vocals) and Britt Reagan (guitar, dulcimer, vocals) as well as Mark Spitznagel (banjo, vocals) and Pete O’Neill (bass, vocals). As a group, the band comes together to create music that bridges the gap between the sound of classic Bluegrass music and more recent music that falls into the category of Americana because of the blending of styles to create a new sound and feel to the music. The Americana style from The Good Morning Nags blends Bluegrass, Folk and some Country together to create a sound that will find its place among fans of early forms of music. Throw in a little Old Timey influence to the music and you have a recipe for musical success.

Having originally formed back in 2010, The Good Morning Nags spent some of their time busking in the subways in New York. Since that time, hundreds of performances were logged before the band even recorded their first EP. But now, the band is celebrating the release of their new self-titled EP. The new self-titled EP from The Good Morning Nags begins with the track “Sugar Baby”. The track features a strong Folk/Bluegrass blend with a slight hint of something more to it. The blend suggests that this version of the track is not quite what lovers of Folk or Bluegrass may come to expect. That firmly puts the track into the Americana genre. The vocals on the track find the vocalists blending their voices in harmony just like you’d find on many Bluegrass tracks. Blending everything together into one song, The Good Morning Nags have a strong track that leads off their self-titled release.

With the next track on their self-titled release, the band does what most Bluegrass bands do: They take a shot at performing a well-known tune to make it their own, just like they did with “Sugar Baby”. It is with the standard tune “Blackberry Bush” that the band truly shows off their roots. While the standard is usually a spotlight tune for the fiddle, The Good Morning Nags have created a version that revolves around the fiddle from Tim Hassler while still incorporating the entire band in on the tune. The ensemble feel of the track creates a completely different take on the tune while still allowing the original tune to shine through.

“Love Like No Other,” an original track on the release, ventures slightly away from the Bluegrass style of the group and takes on the styling of the Country Rock band of The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. In fact, the tune recalls the early days of that band when they were creating music with a rather Old Timey feel to it. Specifically, “Love Like No Other” feels as if it would fit right alongside tracks from The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s self-titled debut where several of the tracks were arrangements of older songs. While there is a definite Old Timey feel to “Love Like No Other,” that sound is perfect for lovers of the style.

The Good Morning Nags return to a standard mindset on the next track. “Cripple Creek” finds the band in full Bluegrass mode as they perform the tune. The version of the song that the band chose dates back over one hundred years to 1905. The track features the mandolin of Ben Quinn as the focal point in the song and the band creates a version of the song that lives up to that old standard while adding a nice energetic delivery to the music. “Cripple Creek” as performed by The Good Morning Nags finds the band in fine form as they bring a rather old tune into the modern era.

The Good Morning Nags bring their new self-titled album to a close with a track that could easily be described as the band’s theme song. “Good Morning Girl” finds the band creating a track that takes the genre of Bluegrass and turns it on its head. The resulting track contains the feel of Bluegrass but with a very modern take on it. The music has a bit of an edge to it while the lyrics have a slightly wry feel to them while being upbeat at the same time. The lyrics find the singer (a Good Morning Nag) singing an ode to his girlfriend (a Good Morning Girl). And then, when he has his say, the girl in question sings her response. The duet-style track is basically a love song being sung by two much worn people looking for their perfect matches. While it has a rather modern feel to the lyrics and music, underneath it all, the track has a timeless appeal to it.

The new self-titled release from The Good Morning Nags is a release that has a lot going for it: There are the elements of classic Bluegrass, classic Folk music and fresh arrangements of classic Bluegrass tunes all mixed together. While the album may be a tad unusual for those looking for a straight-out classic Bluegrass release, those with an open mind and an appreciation for Bluegrass music, Folk music and even Country music will much to enjoy on this album.

To check out the music of The Good Morning Nags, check out the band’s tune called “Love Like No Other”.

To purchase a copy of the new self-titled EP from The Good Morning Nags, click HERE.  

For more information, check out the band’s PR firm, WHIPLASH PR.

Sour BruthersGrowing up together helps to add a certain amount of familiarity to the way members in a band relate to each other. One band that is truly creating music with a definite “family” feel to their music is the band called The Söur Bruthers. And even though the members of the band grew up around each other, they all went their separate ways when joining up with previous musical projects. But those previous projects are what have helped to shape the music of The Söur Bruthers.

Chicago-based band The Söur Bruthers consist of band members: Tim Dlaregztif – Guitar/Vocals, Mike Argyrakis – Guitar Vocals, Bill Lloyd – Bass/Vocals and Tony Alunni – Drums/Drums. Each member of the group (or Bruther) drops their own last name when performing in the band and uses Sour as the band identity. Together, Tim, Mike, Bill and Tony Sour blend their various musical influences to create a sound in their band that can only be described as Americana because of the Retro-Pop, Blues, Hard Rock and Country vibes that flow through the songs of the group. What the band calls “SOURLICIOUS ROCK WITH A COUNTRY TWANG!” flows through the band’s debut self-titled EP.

“Sinkin’ Down” is the first track on the self-titled release from The Söur Bruthers. With this track, the band begins their EP with one of the hardest-hitting tracks. The Rock and Roll track contains a slight Country twang in the music. Moreover, the music of the band seems to recall the style of Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band. While the music is closer to Rock and Roll, the lyrics recall Country music a little more. The energy contained within the playing of the band on “Sinkin’ Down” made the choice for leading off the EP with the song a good one as the track hits and hits hard, giving the listener a good indication of what is to come.

In the short time that The Söur Bruthers have been a band, the group has already seen some positive reactions to the music. The band’s song “Better Days” was entered in the 2017 18th Annual Great American Song Contest where it won the contest. “Better Days” contains a musical mix that actually closer to Southern Rock in the vein of a band like Molly Hatchet than it is to actual Country music. Because of the strong guitar-based foundation to the song, the track would belong more on an Album-Oriented Rock radio format rather than on a Country music format. The driving nature of the track’s music helps to create one of the more powerful moments on the release.

The six-song self-titled EP from The Söur Bruthers continues with the track “3A.M.” With this track, the band creates a sound that brings to mind another group, The Beat Farmers, as both bands have very similar blends of styles in their music, as well as the same sort of lyrical content in their words. The Country-Rock music in the song creates a track that would easily fit on any modern-day Country music format. “3A.M.” is easily one of the best tracks that make up the EP. The only thing is that the track should be a lot longer, as it currently doesn’t even hit the 3-minute mark.

The Söur Bruthers pick up the pace of the music on the next track of “Wash Me”. With this track, the band increases the energy level of their playing while stripping their sound of anything Country music-related. The resulting track finds the band creating a song that is straight-out Rock and Roll. Actually, the track would be easily categorized as being “Hard Rock”. That Hard Rock approach comes courtesy of powerful guitars that push the energy level of the song up a notch or two when compared to the band’s more Country-flavored tracks. “Wash Me” is one of the more energetic tracks on the band’s self-titled EP.

The self-titled EP from The Söur Bruthers comes to a close with the track “Release Me”. With the very first notes from the guitar and the piano on the track, it’s rather clear the track has an extremely commercial feel to the music. The track is mostly Rock and Roll with just a hint of Country to it. The song once again brings to mind acts like Bob Seger or other artists from the eighties as the song would easily fit in with the more rockin’ acts from the era. As the final track of the EP, “Release Me” hits hard from the first note and takes the release home on a very strong note.

With their new self-titled EP, Chicago’s The Söur Bruthers have created a release that makes good use of every musical influence that exists within the quartet. When the band wants to create a Country-flavored track, the result is a track that sounds very authentic and would be welcome on any Country radio format. And when the band goes in a more Rock and Roll direction, they create tracks that will satisfy any fan of the Rock and Roll genre. As you listen to the self-titled EP from this band of friends, it becomes very clear that long-time friends make the best bandmates as The Söur Bruthers are a very tight musical ensemble.

For a taste of the music from The Söur Bruthers, check out the band’s track “Better Days,” the song that helped the band win the 18th Annual Great American Song Contest.

For more information, check out the band’s PR firm, Whiplash PR.

DearJohn-LPCover copyRobert Ellis and Courtney Hartman are two singer-songwriters that have found a love for Folk music. By themselves, the two musicians have been creating their own styles of the musical genre. Ellis is currently promoting a Self-Titled Album released on Nine West Records that features eleven tracks of music. At the same time, Hartman is promoting her Nothing We Can Say EP that features six tracks of music. These two relative newcomers found themselves meeting backstage while performing at a music festival back in 2013. That meeting led to the two musicians discovering a mutual admiration for the music of John Hartford, the singer-songwriter who was known for his Bluegrass, Country and Folk-flavored songs that were created between the early fifties and 2001 when he passed away. Eventually, the two separate musicians joined up to create a ten-song tribute album that features ten songs from the career of John Hartford. The new album from Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman is entitled Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford.

The new tribute release of John Hartford’s music from Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman features the two musicians as they sing and play their guitars. The simplicity of the guitar/voice combination from the two singers gives the album a gentleness that matches up well with the style of Hartford’s original compositions. With the new recordings of Hartford’s music created by Ellis and Hartman using only guitars, the new versions not only give Hartford’s songs new life, they also make each song feel fresh.

Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford begins with the song “Old Time River Man”. Originally, the song (fully-titled “Where Does an Old Time River Man Go”) was recorded by Hartford as he played the tune on banjo. The new version by Ellis and Hartman was created using guitars. And that guitar approach breathes new life into the track, making the song by the duo feel unique. The song also features both musicians as they sing the lyrics together. The double-layered vocal add yet another element to the track as the voices from the two singers blend well together in the melody of the words.

With the track “Them Way Long Time Ago Times,” the wit of Hartford is brought out well with Ellis and Hartman’s version of the track. The song’s lyrics have a fun, light feel that mixes well with the acoustic guitars on the track. The music has the same light feel that is featured in the vocals from the duo. The track ends up seemingly flying by as the listener allows the track to play out.

The Dear John release continues with the song “Gentle On My Mind”. Perhaps one of the most well-known songs from Hartman, “Gentle On My Mind” became a hit for Glenn Campbell back in 1967 and again in 1968 to ultimately end up being a Top 10 song on the Easy Listening charts. The new version of the song finds Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman creating a version of the song that pays homage to the original Campbell hit. The two voices from Ellis and Hartman blend well together on this track. Having been released as the first single off of Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford, the track “Gentle On My Mind” is easily one of the best songs on the release.

Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman’s new release continues with the song “Right in the Middle of Falling for You”. With this track, the duo makes a choice of slowing the pace of the track down. The slower pace and easier feel of the music adds an even stronger Folk flavor to the track while also increasing the romantic feel to the lyrics of the song. While the previous tracks also feature both Ellis and Hartman singing the lyrics, “Right in the Middle of Falling for You” comes off as a duet. Like the duo’s version of “Gentle on My Mind,” this song ends up being a shining moment on the Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford release.

After four song that featured both of the artists combing their vocals on the lyrics to the songs, Robert Ellis finally takes the lead on vocals for one track. On “Here I Am in Love Again,” the unmistakable feel of Country music comes through in the picking on the guitars on the track. About halfway through the song, the vocals from Courtney Hartman help to add the dual vocal delivery feel that listeners have grown familiar with from the earlier tracks.

The track of “Delta Queen Waltz” shows off the playing abilities of Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman on their guitars. Together, the two instruments intertwine nicely to create the melody of the track while the vocals from both Ellis and Hartman bring the lyrics to life. The easy pace of the track makes for a perfect song to dance to. The track is one of the best for showing off the talents of both of the singer-songwriters. Singer-songwriters Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman have created one of the best tribute albums to be released in a long time.

The ten tracks that make up the Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford release combine to make a great tribute to one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th Century. If you are a fan of John Hartford, or you have become a fan of either Robert Ellis or Courtney Hartman, this release definitely deserves to be included in your music collection.

To hear a sample from the release, check out the song “Gentle On My Mind”.

For more information, check out the PR firm for the album, Grandstand Media & Management.

The Dear John – a Tribute to the Songs of John Hartford album is being released with the help of the Refuge Foundation for the Arts, a non-profit organization which provides sanctuary for the pursuit of creative expression through music and art. To check out the Refuge Foundation for the Arts, click on the link.

Randy SteelePerforming one style of music for many years can make a musician crave something different from time to time; especially if that musician has an inner desire to stretch as an artist. Having spent much time as part of the band Slim Pickens Bluegrass, Randy Steele is one musician who is currently on a mission to create something different from the usual Bluegrass music associated with the band he has been with since 2008. And right now, Randy Steele is getting the chance to do just that as he is currently celebrating the release of a new solo album that features a lot more variety than just Bluegrass.

The resulting collection of new music from Randy Steele is a mix of Americana music that features a variety of sounds. Along with the Bluegrass music that has been a part of Randy Steele’s life for the decade or so, Steele’s solo material incorporates a mix of Country music along with other Roots music influences. Together, these musical influences help to shape the new release from Randy Steele that is entitled Songs from the Suck, a title that refers to Suck Creek, a river near where Steele currently lives.

Songs from the Suck from Randy Steele begins with the track “Northbound 29”. With this track, Randy Steele and his band of musicians create a track that is largely based in the Bluegrass genre. Like much Bluegrass music, the sound of the track features the banjo and the fiddle as the main instruments that help to bring the song to life. The track Of “Northbound 29” comes across as just as authentic as much older songs that have been created by bands like Slim Pickens Bluegrass for decades.

The album continues with the song “Angels with Halos”. Along with the musicians that help to back him up, Randy Steele creates a track that is a lot closer to Country music than Bluegrass. The track contains a much fuller sound as the music contains not only the guitar and fiddle, but also steel guitar and snare drum, creating a track that would be right at home on Country radio formats that feature a mix that incorporates the older styles of Country music. “Angels with Halos” is the perfect track for those listeners who are looking for the sounds of Country music’s past.

With the next song, Randy Steele creates an instrumental track entitled “Shove the Pig’s Foot a Little Closer to the Fire”. The feeling of a Bluegrass reel on the track creates a song that, once again, makes good use of Steele’s Bluegrass background.

Randy Steele continues his album with the track “Mobile Soon”. With this track, Steele returns to a Country state of mind in the music as he plays a slow-paced song that feels very much like an ode to the city. The use of guitar and fiddle make a solid yet simple combination in the music to create a track that feels timeless in nature. Whether today or twenty years ago, “Mobile Soon” could find a large audience on Country music radio stations. “Mobile Soon” is easily one of the tracks on Steele’s Songs from the Suck that stands out for all the right reasons.

One of the tracks on Songs from the Suck that stands out because of the more progressive feel of the music is “Hard Givin’”. Randy Steele and the rest of the band seem to seamlessly combine the Country and Bluegrass genres to create a hybrid sound in the song’s music. The track feels as if it has brought the Bluegrass genre into a more modern age. “Hard Givin’” is yet another track on the release that listeners will gravitate towards.

Taking the music back to an earlier time, Randy Steele and company create the track “1983,” a song that feels as if it had been influenced by the likes of Earl Scruggs and Lester Flatt of Foggy Mountain Boys fame. The track features the banjo and fiddle as the track brings to mind the earlier days of recorded music. The track of “1983” even feels more authentic as the entire track falls under the two-minute play-time, which would have been perfect for a 78 RPM gramophone record.

The final track of “…To the New Perspective” features a simple banjo and vocal arrangement. The track of the release brings to mind the music of someone like Earl Scruggs as the track’s simplistic approach has a definite Old Timey feel to it. That retro feel to the music seems to have been the perfect way to bring the Songs from the Suck to a close as it recalls the early recordings of Bluegrass music.

There is much to love about the Songs from the Suck release from Randy Steele. Whether it is the classic Bluegrass approach or the more modern musical style, the album features songs that will fit nicely within any Country or Bluegrass lover’s music collection.

To check out the music of Randy Steele, listen to the song “Hard Givin’“.

For more information, check out Randy Steele’s PR firm Whiplash PR.

Peasant MoonAlt-Country duo Peasant Moon came together when two people from different continents joined forces. Singer-songwriter and Australia native Harvey Russell makes up one half of the combo while longtime collaborator Josie Rothwell originally came from the west coast of the United States. However, the duo is currently making their home in Russell’s native land of Australia.

Together, Harvey Russell and Josie Rothwell create music as Peasant Moon that contains a strong Country flavor with plenty of other elements that require their style of music to be categorized as Americana. To bring that Americana sound to life, the duo draws influence from the likes of the Civil Wars, Mandolin Orange, even Ryan Adams. Together, those influences make Peasant Moon’s musical approach very heavy on the folk/country sound. The duo is currently promoting their new 5-song release entitled Our Timing Was Wrong. To help bring their new album of Our Timing Was Wrong to life, Harvey Russell and Josie Rothwell are joined by Aaron Langman (pedal steel, electric guitar), Jonathan Kelly (bass) and Rich Burrows (drums). Together, the ensemble creates a very strong release.

The new release of Our Timing Was Wrong from Peasant Moon begins with the track “Back in Time”. The first track on the release contains a strong country/rock combination. “Back in Time’s” musical combination feels very commercial in its tone and the laidback pace of the music makes good use of the Country music that the band has as an influence. The duo also seems to add just a little bit of Folk music influence to the song, as well. “Back in Time” contains so many different musical elements together that combine effortlessly to create one solid track. The song feels very commercial and would fit well on any Country radio format as well as any Folk format, as well.

Peasant Moon’s new EP continues with the title track of the release. “Our Timing was Wrong” finds the duo adding a lot more of a Country feel to their music. With the inclusion of mandolin and steel guitar, Peasant Moon gives “Our Timing was Wrong” a real Country music flavor. Plus, the lyrics to the song also gives the track that authentic Country flavor. While Harvey Russell comes from Australia, he seems to be doing well in following in the footsteps of fellow Aussie Keith Urban in creating Country music that feels as authentic as anything created here in the U.S. “Our Timing was Wrong” would feel right at home on any Country music radio format.

Harvey Russell and Josie Rothwell take Peasant Moon’s music in a lighter direction for the next track of “Over Again”. With this track, the duo create a track that is much more in the vein of Folk-Rock music than Country music. The mandolin and acoustic guitar help to create most of the flavor to the song as the song proceeds with a light touch and a moderate pace to the music. While the song features Harvey Russell as main vocalist, the vocals from Josie Rothwell help to add a lot of harmony to the lyrics of the song. “Over Again” finds the duo creating a very strong track that would be right at home in the seventies following a band like The Eagles or during the later eighties following The Traveling Wilburys.

The feel of the album changes on the track of “Party”. While the other tracks on Our Timing Was Wrong are full-bodied and contain the entire band helping to back up Peasant Moon, “Party” features a much simpler feel to the music with Russell’s guitar and Aaron Langman’s steel guitar providing much of the track’s musical background. On the track, Harvey Russell and Josie Rothwell create a beautiful duet that would fit well on today’s Country music formats. “Party” is one of the standout tracks on the EP.

Peasant Moon’s Our Timing Was Wrong comes to an end with the track “Leaving Tonight”. The musical combination of the song brings to mind something that would have fit right in on the Every Picture Tells a Story album from Rod Stewart as it would have fit with those songs. The Folk-Rock track has the same sort of feel as several of the songs on that album as the music and vocals would both fit in with those songs.

Our Timing Was Wrong from Australia’s Peasant Moon is a solid five-song release. Harvey Russell and Josie Rothwell have created an Americana release that is as strong as anything released here in the U.S.

Peasant Moon’s Our Timing Was Wrong will be released on August 31, 2017. Before the band’s EP is out, check out “Our Timing Was Wrong,” the title track from their upcoming release.