Posts Tagged ‘The Eagles’

You rarely find a group of musicians that create their own music with orchestral strings as part of their sound, but that is exactly what you will find with the band The Furious Seasons. The Furious Seasons is a band that takes its cue from earlier bands like The Left Banke, Electric Light Orchestra and even Poi Dog Pondering. And just like these previous bands, The Furious Seasons’ sound stands out from the rest of the music industry because of the beauty that can be found in the music from the band.

Singer-guitarist David Steinhart has taken his vast recording history and put it to use in the creation of the releases from The Furious Seasons. Along with Steinhart, his brother Jeff Steinhart plays the bass, his nephew Nate Steinhart plays the guitar, Bob Gannon plays the drums and Ray Chang adds his violin to the music to help give the band’s music its baroque feel. It’s that baroque feel in the rock music that shows up quite a bit on the band’s new album of My Analog Face.

My Analog Face begins with the track “Let’s Sweep Together”. The baroque/pop feel to the track seems to transport the listener back in time. With a beautiful arrangement that makes the song feel like it would have come out of the British Invasion and the strings that accompany the music, “Let’s Sweep Together” gives the listener the indication that they’re in for an interesting musical experience.

Strings are used once again on the album’s second track called “On the Wire”. This time, the strings help to give the song a more emotional feel than “Let’s Sweep Together”. The band combines together to create a slow-paced song that is perfect for the duet that is sung by David Steinhart and Justine Bennett. The strings included on the track give an emotional touch to the song.

On the song “We Go Down,” The Furious Seasons seem to once again slip into a retro style of music; this time, taking a musical approach that may remind some of the hit singles from 1970’s AM radio. In a style that combines elements from artists like B.W. Stevenson, Cat Stevens and even the Eagles, “We Go Down” brings back the lite rock sound of days gone by. Staying in a seventies frame of mind for another song, My Analog Face’s “A Few Miles Back” begins with a sound that seems to have been influenced by well-known composer Henry Mancini. The Mancini Influence on the track definitely dates the sound of the song, but it also helps to create one of the prettiest moments on the release.

While the album as a whole has many enjoyable listening moments, it is the song “Keys and Watch” that will resonate the most with today’s music buying public. With pop/rock music that seems to have an ultimately timeless feel to it and lyrics poetic enough to feel as if Bob Dylan had written them, “Keys and Watch” would easily fit onto any Adult Contemporary station today. It is also the strongest track on the newest release from The Furious Seasons.

The song “Hey Jon” is another track that would fit on today’s Adult Contemporary radio as it contains the sort of timeless pop/rock as the earlier track of “Keys and Watch”. The song about seeing an old friend again has a certain familiarity to it that everyone can get behind, just like “Keys and Watch”.

To finish off the album, The Furious Seasons include one cover tune. And in this case, it’s the song “Operator (That’s Not the Way it Feels)”. The Jim Croce song is given new life with this version from The Furious Seasons. The Furious Seasons take the song and make it their own, all while not straying too far from the original version.

David Steinhart and the rest of The Furious Seasons have put together a release that has a nice and relaxed feel to it. The many different styles to the band’s music on the album help it feel unique from track to track. The baroque pop mixed with the Adult Contemporary creates two different sides to the band’s style. Whether you’re a fan of today’s music or you prefer the styles that came before, My Analog Face from The Furious Seasons has something for everyone. 

This album review was done back in 2012 when I was still reviewing for ReviewYou. The review was sent off to the company per our agreement. However, it was never published by me. I only recently realized this. So to make up for that oversight, I am publishing the review here.

As far as The Furious Seasons are concerned, the band has stayed busy since the time when they requested this review. In fact, you can find several albums from the ensemble. The latest of which is entitled Now Residing Abroad.

To discover the music of The Furious Seasons including both My Analog Face and Now Residing Abroad, you can the band out on the spotify account.

Mark RogersVirginia/DC-based singer-songwriter Mark Rogers finds himself in a situation that many others have experienced. Years ago, he has spent time creating music. The style of music that he created incorporated Folk, Folk-Rock, and even a little Bluegrass influence. Needless to say, the style of the music created by Rogers would have fit quite nicely with music from the sixties.

But then Mark Rogers found himself creating a family. Music would have to wait. And wait it has. Then, after an extended time away, Rogers has resumed his pursuit of music. In fact, Rogers has made it official as he just created a new EP of original music. The new EP from Mark Rogers is entitled Rearranged.

Rearranged from Mark Rogers begins with the “Right Here”. The track features a sound that would have been right at home during the seventies. In fact, the track’s Folk-Rock feel brings to mind the sound and feel of a band like The Eagles. That sound comes courtesy of guitars that bring to mind the various musicians from the band. The easy pace of the track and the rather familiar Eagles-inspired sound would have felt right at home on AM radio. Right from the start, the track “Right Here” makes Rearranged from Mark Rogers feel like a musical release that fans of Pop-Rock music would truly enjoy.

While the previous track brought to mind the styles of The Eagles, Mark Rogers changes his musical approach on the song “Slow Parade”. The second track of the release features a style that incorporates just a little Beatles flavor into the music. Although it is not overwhelming, the listener can hear just a little Lennon/McCartney influence in the lyrical content of the song. That Beatles-esque lyrical content and melody contained in the words of the song brings to mind that band’s style from back in the sixties when they were just making a name for themselves. Along with the Beatles influence in the lyrics, “Slow Parade” contains a musical approach that once again contains a definite Folk-Rock sound.

After Mark Rogers spent two songs creating music with a throwback feel, the next track of “I Can’t Say Why” features a timeless sound. The Folk-Rock style on the track contains a strong musical approach that could have been played in the seventies, eighties, nineties, or even on today’s Pop-Rock radio formats. Throughout the song, the acoustic approach of the music helps to create a track with a gentle feel to the music. With the inclusion of the electric guitar, Rogers adds a nice amount of energy to the song.

With the track “Waiting,” Mark Rogers once again conjures up the sound of the seventies. The slow pace and easy feel to the music brings to mind a song like “Harvest Moon” from Neil Young. Much like Young’s song that contains a throwback feel to the music, the feel of “Waiting” from Mark Rogers would fit in with older tracks but would also fit on modern-day Adult Contemporary radio formats. “Waiting” is one of the strongest tracks on the Rearranged release from Mark Rogers.

The new release from Mark Rogers continues with the track “Takes Me Back Again”. On this track, Rogers continues to create music with a strong Folk background, but changes things up a little as he incorporates a strong Jazz influence to the music. That Jazz influence comes in the form of the guitar on the track and the light vocal delivery from Rogers. The rather short track shows off Mark Roger’s playing ability.

Mark Rogers brings his new EP to a close with the track “The Blue of December”. As the song revolves around the sound of the piano and the acoustic guitar, the two instruments combine to create a track that contains a very laidback feel. The low-key track brings the Rearranged release from Mark Rogers to a close on a gentle note.

Rearranged from Mark Rogers is a short six-song EP that gives the listener a very strong Folk-inspired . But this is just a taste of what is to come!
For a taste of Mark Rogers’ new EP, check out the track “The Blue of December“.   

Check out Rearranged from Mark Rogers. The album is available on Bandcamp.  You can also find the album on GooglePlay and iTunes

For more information, check out Mark Rogers’ PR firm, Whiplash PR

DocFell & Co. CoverMuch of today’s Country music radio sounds as if it was nothing more than Rock and Roll with a Southern accent. And while there are some really good artists out there today creating that style, what is sadly missing from today’s Country radio are artists that want to keep at least some of the old traditional Country sound alive. Thankfully, there are still a few people who are still out there looking to incorporate some of the old style back into the modern version of Country music. One artist keeping some of that traditional Country flavor alive is Dr. John Fell, also known as DocFell.

While spending his days as a general practitioner, Dr, John Fell spends his free time creating Country music that incorporates just a little Pop-rock flavor that helps to bring the traditional Country music style into the 21st Century. To help bring that Country/Pop-rock mixture to life, singer-songwriter/guitarist John Fell is joined by multi-instrumentalist Kyle Brown and several others including John Barker (electric bass guitar), Kevin Rose and Joe Sloan (percussion) who help to make up the ensemble known as DocFell and Co. Just recently, the ensemble released the 2017 album entitled Dust Bowl Heart.

Dust Bowl Heart begins with “Lonesomeville”. The first few seconds of the track features a very Old-Timey and tinny sound to the track as if it had been created near the advent of recording. The track segues into a much more upbeat feel that features a Country sound reminiscent of Jerry Reed’s songs, especially something like “Tupelo Mississippi Flash”. The track about a very lonely man has a strangely upbeat feel to the music, considering the lonesome nature of the person in the song that is telling the story.

With the song “Love Sick,” DocFell and Co. takes their sound back a few decades. The track features a Classic Country sound that would have been around in the early fifties. The song’s style definitely brings to mind something from somebody George Jones or any of the other male Country stars from the same era of the music. The inclusion of the callbacks from the band really adds a lot of energy to the Old time feel of the track.

On the track “Oklahoma Lady,” DocFell and Co. create a track that seems to be more than a little bit influenced by the musical supergroup the Eagles. This seems to contain feel of some of that band’s tunes that they would be famous for. “Oklahoma Lady” has the same type of magic that was found on songs like “Desperado” or “The Best of My Love”. One of the main elements on the song that gives the track that Eagles flavor is the playing from guitarist Kyle Brown that brings to mind the style of that band. “Oklahoma Lady” also contains a certain amount of retro flavor that would have made the track perfect for radio airplay back in the seventies at the same time that the Eagles were climbing the charts.

Dust Bowl Heart continues with “Home on the Hill”. On this song, DocFell and Co. bring to mind yet another band that contained a similar Country Rock vibe like The Eagles were known for. “Home on the Hill” contains a lyrical and musical style that is reminiscent of Michael Nesmith and the First National Band, especially off of that band’s Magnetic South release. The track also contains a little bit of flavor that would remind some of the song “Garden Party” from Rick Nelson. The combination of the styles on “Home on the Hill” creates a track that feels very familiar to the listener and would easily have fit on radio a few decades ago. But that doesn’t mean that the track feels outdated. It would easily feel right at home on radio today.

While most of the Dust Bowl Heart release from DocFell and Co. incorporates a lot of earlier styles of Country music, the track “Broken Heart” brings the music of the band up to today’s style of Country music. The Country/Rock hybrid that is so prevalent on today’s Country stations is just the style that makes up the sound for “Broken Heart”. In a duet-style setting, the vocals of the song ask “Whatcha gonna do with a broken heart?” Of any of the songs on the new album from DocFell and Co, “Broken Heart” is easily the track that would fit well on today’s Country music formats.

Throughout the ten songs that make up the Dust Bowl Heart release from DocFell and Co, there is plenty of variety for those fans of Country music. No matter what era of the style you gravitate towards, there is something for you on this solid album from Dr, John Fell, Kyle Brown and the rest of the gang.

To check out the sound of DocFell and Co, click HERE for the song “Oklahoma Lady”.

 

Very few times will you ever find a band that lasts very long; but Jackopierce is one of the bands that are made up of musicians who just won’t give up. The musicians Jack O’Neill and Cary Pierce have taken their music in several directions over the years. With their new album of Everywhere All the Time, Pierce and O’Neill have created songs that have a very commercial sound to them. With that style, they are sure to make new fans to add to the huge list of fans they already have.

With the newest album of music from this musical group, the duo of Jack O’Neill and Cary Pierce seem to take many different approaches to the music on the album. From straight-out acoustic rock to songs with folk influence, the feeling on the Everywhere All the Time album changes from song to song, creating a release that promises something for everyone.

Everywhere All the Time starts off with the song “Into Me”. Taking some influence from Jason Mraz and some more of today’s pop/rock artists and bands, the rock song has a sound that has a good groove and will get people moving.

After one song with a good groove, Jackopierce creates yet another track with a groove. This time, the song “Finally Free” ends up feeling like the first single of the album. The light feeling of the acoustic and electric guitars combine together with a drumbeat that grabs your attention and won’t let go. The song brings to mind the sound of bands like Vertical Horizon and other pop/rock bands that would fit in on today’s Top 40 radio stations.

Taking a chance to create a sound all their own, the song “Around Me Now” by Jackopierce has a stronger rock feel than the previous tracks on the release. While it still has a pop feel that may remind some of songs by Sugar Ray, there’s enough originality in this track to give people something new to listen to.

Jackopierce takes a different approach with the song “Listen to Me”. The duo of Jack O’Neill and Cary Pierce create the song with an acoustic feel. The acoustic guitars and keyboards in the background take the listener into a folk state of mind. The song has a very catchy sound that may have you thinking of pop/rock from artists from the seventies. The folk feeling that blends with the acoustic rock on the song helps create a mellow feeling while keeping the catchy melody of the song strong.

Sometimes O’Neill and Pierce wear their influences too much on their sleeves; this is definitely the case with the song “Alright By Me”. It is on this very catchy song that the duo brings forward some influence from Blessid Union of Souls into their musical mix. The song about a girl who falls in love with the narrator of the song comes a bit too close to Blessid Union’s best known track “Hey Leonardo“. Though “Alright By Me” could stand on its own if you knew nothing of Blessid Union, for those who do know the band, the connection between the two bands on this song is too obvious; whether O’Neill and Pierce were aware of that connection or not.

Jack O’Neill and Cary Pierce let the lyrics of “Let Go of Me” come to forefront of the song. The ability to take a soft rock song and let the lyrics take control is a sign of good songwriting. “Let Go of Me” is one of the best songs as far as the lyrics are concerned. The play between the two vocalists during the chorus of the song creates one of the best choruses on the whole release. And with the accordion in the background, “Let Go of Me” is one of the best tracks on the newest release from Jackopierce.

The album stays with a soft rock feel with the next song of “Lonely”. Like the song “Let Go of Me” before, “Lonely” plays with your heart as you listen to the emotional lyrics of the song. Like other moments on the album, “Lonely” feels like it comes from a different era of rock. The beauty in the song brings to mind some of the artists in the 70s. In fact, you might find a little bit of The Eagles in the music to the song.

From the pop/rock of “Into Me,” the groove found on “Finally Free,” and the soft rock on songs like “Let Go of Me” and “Lonely,” Jackopierce has created a new release that gives the listener many different styles of rock music on the album. For longtime fans of the band, this is a solid release that should make you happy. For those about to discover the music of the band, Everywhere All the Time’s ever-changing musical style will give you many songs that will fit into your music library. There’s a lot of good music on this release no matter where you fall.

To discover the music of Jackopierce, here is the video to the band’s songAround Me Now“.